A Better Blog: Episode 5

Link out. You help raise the status of your writing by linking to more content. It may help “anchor” your position, providing supporting evidence, or help connect your ideas to those of others. If you mention your school, link its webpage to its name. If you mention another teacher, link to their blog. Creating webs within your posts can give authority to your writing and provide a nice service readers to expand their interaction through more reading.

not the weakest link

And a tip for folks who are embedding links: don’t use text like “Click Here” for text chosen for the actual links! First, it’s discouraged by web usability experts. Second, the reader may not be reading on a computer (and no, don’t write “Tap or Click here!”). Third, “Click Here” stands out, but it doesn’t help your content stand out. Instead, it’s best practice to link the beginning or ending of sentences with more than one word.

Consider these three examples:

  1. Google Reader is a popular online tool for collecting and reading RSS newsfeeds.
  2. Google Reader is a popular online tool for collecting and reading RSS feeds. Click here to visit that site.
  3. Google Reader is a popular online tool for collecting and reading RSS news feeds.

The first one makes sense. The important “keyword” or phrase is the product name. It makes sense that if you click on the title of a webpage, you’ll go to the webpage.

The second example does good to highlight the title of the website in bold text, but then the second part with the “Click me” is unnecessary.

The third example is an alternative… it’s less clear if you’re going to go to Google Reader, or maybe learn about “collecting and reading” feeds. The strength behind the third example is that it is an easier target to click or tap, because it uses more text. Like the first example, it’s strong too because the link came at the end (or beginning) of the sentence.