Volunteer Background Check Clarification

One of the hallmarks of  our tremendous County is the presence of an army of community volunteers. These selfless people give their energy, time and unique skill sets to the greater mission of inspiring and maximizing the potential of our students.

We feel it’s important to remind everyone of our stance on the issue of requiring volunteers to submit to a background check.

The Code of Virginia requires that:

As a condition of employment, school boards of the Commonwealth shall require any applicant who is offered or accepts employment after July 1, 1989, whether full-time or part-time, permanent, or temporary, to submit to fingerprinting and to provide personal descriptive information to be forwarded along with the applicant’s fingerprints through the Central Criminal records Exchange to the Federal Bureau of Investigation for the purpose of obtaining criminal history record information regarding such applicant. (Code Reference)

 

Let’s be clear. School Boards in Virginia are required by law to do a background check on anyone who’s going to work in the school division – no matter what capacity or how long they plan to work. Hourly tutors doing remediation for a week, evening custodians, substitute teachers – doesn’t matter. If we’re going to employ them for even one hour, the law says they need to be fingerprinted.

In Goochland, we have chosen to closely follow the guidelines for employees as we consider our volunteers. We have flexibility, but have chosen only to exercise it in very unique circumstances.

The guidelines we use include two simple questions:

  • Will the volunteer ever be unsupervised with children?
  • Will the volunteer be regularly spending time with children?

If the answer is “yes” to either question, we require a background check. Like the Code, we don’t not attempt to draw lines among people – those we know/don’t know, those our friends know/don’t know, those who seem trustworthy/seem suspicious, those with whom we’ve worked before/those who we’ve never met.

That’s a fruitless exercise and a very slippery slope. We all know people we trust explicitly and would never suggest they are a danger to your children. Our commitment is to ensure every parent that we will not give any adult access to their children, unsupervised or repeated, without ensuring that adult has completed the background check – the same one required by law of our employees.

We believe it’s our obligation to confidently look our community in the eyes and say we are doing all we can to ensure your children are safe at school.

It can be awkward to require those who have been volunteering in past years without the background check and doing inspiring work in our schools to submit to a fingerprint check. Those are often individuals who are well-known to be powerful positive influences in our community. It seems to be an affront to the selfless and generous spirit those people have poured out when we ask them to go through a criminal background check. It’s as though we think they might be criminals.

We don’t. Just as we don’t suspect the exemplary candidates to whom we offer jobs in our division to be criminals either. But as the law requires that we screen all employees, we extend that same level of precaution to all adults who will have repeated or unsupervised access to your children. No matter who they are.

Not because we suspect they need it, but because we want every parent to rest easy that we aren’t making that kind of subjective judgement call when it comes to the safety and wellbeing of their children.

We would never want to offend anyone, especially our wonderful volunteers. It’s even more important to us that every parent, after they put their children on a bus or drop them off at the school doors, goes into the day will absolute certainty that their children are safe.

Your child’s safety is non-negotiable.

Message to our Community

Hello GCPS Families,

We are writing to make you aware of a situation that occurred today.  Through various outlets including social media, many students and families have become concerned that there have been threats of violence at Goochland High School tomorrow. We wanted to be sure our information was verified and  accurate before releasing an official statement to our community.

We are aware of these threats and have been working diligently with law enforcement to determine an appropriate response.  Additionally, as we have been made aware of students that are involved in this incident we have asked our law enforcement partners to contact or visit families of the rumored student(s) this evening if they have not already been in touch with the families.  Whereas our investigation has not led us to believe there are any credible threats, we are handling each students’ situation per our student code of conduct and our law enforcement partners are also considering consequences.

We are treating this situation with utmost seriousness and attention. As an added measure, the Sheriff has agreed to have a deputy on site immediately.  Additionally, we will have the entire shift at the GMS/GHS complex tomorrow along with another unit at GES.

The safety of our students and staff is our absolute top priority. Our law enforcement partners and the GCPS administration believe there is no credible threat at this time; however to ensure the security of the school we will have additional law enforcement presence throughout the day.

Please do not hesitate to contact me if you have any questions or concerns.  Thanks!

GCPS RECEIVES 24K GRANT AWARD TO SUPPORT SAFETY UPGRADES

Goochland County Public Schools have been chosen to receive $24,000 in funding to support safety preparedness initiatives during the 2015-16 school year. Governor Terry McAuliffe announced last week that the Commonwealth has awarded $6 million in School Security Equipment Grants to help ensure the safety of Virginia’s schools.

The committee that developed the grant application included:

  • Sonny Turner, Maintenance Supervisor
  • Peter Martin, Network Administrator and Technical Services Coordinator
  • Robin Powers, Accounting Technician
  • Tom DeWeerd, Director of technology and Administration
  • Bruce Watson, Director of Career & Technical Education
  • Peter Gretz, Assistant Superintendent of Business Operations

The grant funds will support key initiatives, identified through the work of the GCPS Crisis & School Safety Task Force as well as continued partnership with the Goochland Sheriff’s Office and Fire and Rescue Department. Specifically, this year’s award will enable the division to:

  • establish communication between Goochland High School and Goochland Tech,
  • establish communication between Goochland High School and Goochland PREP,
  • upgrade communication between Goochland Elementary and the ESCE Preschool (2nd floor of Goochland Tech),
  • provide new two-way radios to all schools, including Goochland Tech, the ESCE Preschool, and Goochland PREP,
  • install amplification of the intercom system in shop labs at Goochland Tech where noisy equipment and machinery can make communication challenging, and
  • purchase and implement a “Panic Button” software solution that will enable access to a mobile panic alarm, emergency notification, real-time location tracking, and a mass update system to better facilitate communication and resolution of emergency situations in all school facilities.

“We intend for our schools to be places where students, staff and community members can pursue deeper learning,” superintendent James Lane said. “As we work together to maximize the potential of every learner, we must also commit to ensure that all of our schools are safe.”

The School Security Equipment Grant program was established by the 2013 General Assembly in the aftermath of the December 14, 2012, mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Connecticut.

“All those who visit our schools throughout the school year will be safer today because of this grant award,” school board chairman John Lumpkins said. “This will provide our schools and first responders with necessary tools to respond quickly and effectively if a security threat does arise.”

GCPS Receives 24K Grant to Support Safety Upgrades

Goochland County Public Schools have been chosen to receive $24,000 in funding to support safety preparedness initiatives during the 2015-16 school year. Governor Terry McAuliffe announced last week that the Commonwealth has awarded $6 million in School Security Equipment Grants to help ensure the safety of Virginia’s schools.

The committee that developed the grant application included:

  • Sonny Turner, Maintenance Supervisor
  • Peter Martin, Network Administrator and Technical Services Coordinator
  • Robin Powers, Accounting Technician
  • Tom DeWeerd, Director of technology and Administration
  • Bruce Watson, Director of Career & Technical Education
  • Peter Gretz, Assistant Superintendent of Business Operations

The grant funds will support key initiatives, identified through the work of the GCPS Crisis & School Safety Task Force as well as continued partnership with the Goochland Sheriff’s Office and Fire and Rescue Department. Specifically, this year’s award will enable the division to:

  • establish communication between Goochland High School and Goochland Tech,
  • establish communication between Goochland High School and Goochland PREP,
  • upgrade communication between Goochland Elementary and the ESCE Preschool (2nd floor of Goochland Tech),
  • provide new two-way radios to all schools, including Goochland Tech, the ESCE Preschool, and Goochland PREP,
  • install amplification of the intercom system in shop labs at Goochland Tech where noisy equipment and machinery can make communication challenging, and
  • purchase and implement a “Panic Button” software solution that will enable access to a mobile panic alarm, emergency notification, real-time location tracking, and a mass update system to better facilitate communication and resolution of emergency situations in all school facilities.

“We intend for our schools to be places where students, staff and community members can pursue deeper learning,” superintendent James Lane said. “As we work together to maximize the potential of every learner, we must also commit to ensure that all of our schools are safe.”

The School Security Equipment Grant program was established by the 2013 General Assembly in the aftermath of the December 14, 2012, mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Connecticut.

“Virginia students, teachers, administrators, support staff — and the parents and others who visit our schools throughout the school year — are safer today because of this program,” Superintendent of Public Instruction Steven R. Staples said. “This program enhances school safety and gives our schools and first responders the tools they need to keep out intruders and respond quickly and effectively if a security threat does arise.”

 

Alternative Snow Bus Routes 2014-15

We have revised the alternative “snow bus routes” that could potentially be used in periods of inclement weather. You can click on either route sheet below to enlarge:

 

“Will these alternate routes be used every time there is snow on the roads?”

No. Use of these routes is dependent upon main artery roads being safe for travel. We will coordinate our alternate system with VDOT so that they are aware of which roads need attention in order for these routes to be implemented.

“Does this mean we will never close school again for snow?”

No. It is absolutely possible that we will need to close schools again for inclement weather, even with these alternative routes in place. Main artery roads need to be safe for travel before we implement these routes. It should also be noted that these alternative routes are disruptive for many parents’ schedules. They enable us to open schools but they still require that people make personal arrangements that often pose an inconvenience.

These routes will only be used when (a) the main roads that feed the routes are safe for buses and (b) our only alternative would be to close the schools.

“Will there be approximate pick up/drop off times posted?”

Parents are now asked to meet the buses five minutes before the pick-up/drop-off time. When and if we implement these routes, we ask parents arrive at the stops ten minutes early.

“What about children who don’t have transportation to get to the alternate stops?”

The alternate bus routes do provide an opportunity to open schools during extended periods of inclement weather, provided the main arteries of travel that “feed” the alternate stops are clear and safe. The alternate routes, however, are not always convenient for families and they do not fully mitigate the disruption that comes with schedule changes related to unsafe road conditions.

Late openings, early dismissals, and school cancellations disrupt the patterns of many families’ routines. Parents are often forced to make childcare arrangements, sometimes at the last minute. Often parents find it necessary to miss work so they can be home with their children.

The alternative bus routes address some of those issues, but not all. Anything other than door-to-door transportation service will necessitate parents arranging for children to be brought to the common stop identified in the alternate route system. If it’s raining or excessively cold, some may find taking their children to the alternate stop problematic.

Alternate routes are typically only implemented when the division is in danger of missing an inordinate number of days. They enable us to open schools and continue instruction; they do not solve many of the convenience issues parents face during weather-related schedule changes.

“Does this mean children will be dropped off at the alternate stops in the afternoon and parents will need to be there to pick them up?”

Yes. Parents will need to arrange to meet the bus at the alternate stop ten minutes earlier than their regular drop-off time. Though this will cause disruption to many parents’ schedules, I can assure you will only implement these routes when the alternative would be an entire day of absence. Unfortunately there is no other method of establishing an alternate route that avoids unsafe, uncleared secondary roads except to implement stops that are not door-to-door.

“What if I determine that the conditions are not safe for me to transport my child to the alternate bus stop. Will my child’s absence be excused?”

Yes. On days when our schools are open using the alternate snow routes, we will excuse absences for students whose parents are unable to transport to and from the alternate bus route. Students who drive whose parents deem the conditions unsafe for driving will also be excused on days when the alternative routes are implemented.

 

October Anti Bullying Month

We are honoring anti-bullying month in each of our facilities. Each school is pursuing activities to bring the issue to the forefront of student attention and to set the stage for a yearlong focus on honorable, respectful behavior among all GCPS community members.

GMS Principal Jennifer Smith stands next to the box in which students are encouraged to place anonymous feedback regarding bullying and behavior in the school.

We encourage you to note the updates we will offer throughout the month in the blogs and GCPS Facebook and Twitter feeds.

Gallup Student Poll Coming in October

GCPS families,

We will again be administering the Gallup Student Poll measuring Hope, Engagement and Well-being.

The poll is absolutely anonymous and will be administered during school hours. Over 600,000 students from over 2,000 schools, nationwide, will participate in the survey. The data we receive will not identify any specific students, but will give us a picture of how our students are perceiving their experience with us generally.

View the Student Survey Questions Here.

If you would like to opt your child out of the survey, please contact me directly in writing, either by email or letter, no later than Monday, October 6, 2014.

Be a Part of the GHS Distracted Driver Campaign

Someone is killed in a distracted driver accident every 11 minutes.

Goochland High School will be hosting a “Distracted Driving Campaign” next week, May 12-16. GHS teacher and coach, Wes Farkas, and his students developed the slogan “Don’t Be Next!” All students and staff who drive will have the opportunity to sign a pledge to safe and undistracted driving. Please encourage your student to sign the pledge!

Next Friday, May 16, the entire 10th grade class will be wearing either a pink or black T-shirt to give the school a representation of the number of people that are killed during an 8 hour time period (an average school day), due to distracted driving. Drivers are not only distracted by cell phone use and texting, but also eating, music, drinking or other various things that take our attention on the driving task.

T-shirt designed by GHS 10 grade students and teacher, Wes Farkas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Pink Shirts represent individuals that are alive due to NOT being distracted, and students wearing black shirts will represent those who are killed. Studies estimate that someone is killed in a distracted driving accident every 11 minutes. There will be 43 GHS students wearing black T-shirts. They will not be allowed to talk or use their cell phone for the entire school day.

Please wear pink in support of this effort next Friday, May 16, and sign the pledge to driving without distractions.

Goochland Canine Unit at GHS This Morning

At 8:30 a.m. this morning, the Goochland County Public School System collaborated with the Sheriff’s Office to do a drug search at Goochland High School using the Goochland Canine Unit.  The school followed lock-down procedures during the search. Random classrooms were searched after students were removed from the rooms.  The search was concluded at 9:35 a.m.

We are happy to report that the search revealed no evidence of drugs or drug paraphernalia at Goochland High School today!

Goochland County Public Schools have no tolerance for drugs or drug paraphernalia at school.  We believe that random searches of our building are imperative to ensuring that your child attends a safe and orderly school.

Please understand that while we are committed to keeping our parents informed immediately during emergency situations, we will not announce these types of events in advance or while they are underway in order to maintain a safe school environment and to ensure the efficacy of our efforts.

Don’t hesitate to contact me or your child’s principal if you have any questions or concerns.

Alternative Snow Routes and FAQs UPDATED

We have recently published a comprehensive list of alternate “snow” bus routes that we could potentially use in periods of inclement weather. There have been some fantastic questions raised and we wanted to take a moment to clarify a few things.

“Will these alternate routes be used every time there is snow on the roads?”

No. Use of these routes is dependent upon main artery roads being safe for travel. We are coordinating our alternate system with VDOT so that they are aware of which roads need attention in order for these routes to be implemented.

“Does this mean we will never close school again for snow?”

No. It is absolutely possible that we will need to close schools again for inclement weather, even with these alternative routes in place. Main artery roads need to be safe for travel before we implement these routes. It should also be noted that these alternative routes are disruptive for many parents’ schedules. They enable us to open schools but they still require that people make arrangements that often pose an inconvenience.

These routes will only be used when (a) the main roads that feed the routes are safe for buses and (b) our only alternative would be to close the schools.

“Will there be approximate pick up/drop off times posted?”

Parents are now asked to meet the buses five minutes before the pick-up/drop-off time. When and if we implement these routes, we ask parents arrive at the stops ten minutes early.

“What about children who don’t have transportation to get to the alternate stops?”

The alternate bus routes do provide an opportunity to open schools during extended periods of inclement weather, provided the main arteries of travel that “feed” the alternate stops are clear and safe. The alternate routes, however, are not convenient for families and they do not fully mitigate the disruption that comes with schedule changes related to unsafe road conditions.

Late openings, early dismissals, and school cancellations disrupt the patterns of many families routines. Parents are forced to make childcare arrangements, sometimes at the last minute. Often parents find it necessary to miss work so they can be home with their children.

The bus routes address some of that, but not all. Anything other than door-to-door transportation service will necessitate parents arranging for children to be brought to the common stop identified in the alternate route system. If it’s raining or excessively cold, some may find taking their children to the alternate stop problematic.

Alternate routes are typically only implemented when the division is in danger of missing an inordinate number of days. They enable us to open schools and continue instruction; they do not solve many of the convenience issues parents face during weather-related schedule changes.

“Does this mean children will be dropped off at the alternate stops in the afternoon and parents will need to be there to pick them up?”

Yes. Parents will need to arrange to meet the bus at the alternate stop ten minutes earlier than their regular drop-off time. Though this will cause disruption to many parents’ schedules, I can assure you will only implement these routes when the alternative would be an entire day of absence. Unfortunately there is no other method of establishing an alternate route that avoids unsafe, uncleared secondary roads except to implement stops that are not door-to-door.

“What if I determine that the conditions are not safe for me to transport my child to the alternate bus stop. Will my child’s absence be excused?”

Yes. On days when our schools are open using the alternate snow routes, we will excuse absences for students whose parents are unable to transport to and from the alternate bus route. Students who drive whose parents deem the conditions unsafe for driving will also be excused on days when the alternative routes are implemented.

CLICK HERE TO ACCESS THE ALTERNATE ROUTES

Governor’s Office Visits Goochland Schools For School Safety Awareness Week

GOOCHLAND COUNTY, VA – Secretary of Education and Secretary of Public Safety Spend Time in Goochland Classrooms

As part of the School Safety Awareness Week, Virginia’s Secretary of Education, Secretary of Public Safety, representatives from the Department of Criminal Justice and Department of Education joined superintendent James Lane and Goochland Sheriff Jim Agnew for a tour of Randolph Elementary School. The visit is part of a comprehensive outreach from the Governor’s office to better assess school safety needs and build strong relationships among the school and government leadership.

Front Row (left to right): Goochland Sheriff Jim Agnew, RES principal Sandra Crowder, GMS counselor Stacey Rainbolt, Center for School Safety representative Donna Michaelis, VDOE representative JoAnn Burkholder, school board member Beth Hardy. Back Row: Technology Coordinator Peter Martin, Superintendent James Lane, school board chair John Wright, Secretary of Public Safety Brian Rhode, Secretary of Education Javaid Siddiqi, Special Assistant for Policy Ashley Myers. Photo: P. Gretz

Randolph principal, Sandra Crowder led the tour and technical Services Coordinator, Peter Martin, demonstrated the live camera feed fro the new security surveillance cameras recently installed in the high school/middle school complex.

The team sat down with fifth grade students, Antonio Anderson, Ryan Tremain, and Keeley Shoemaker, and engaged in a meaningful dialogue about student perceptions of recent security measures and understanding of safety protocol.

Brian Rhode discusses safety protocol with RES fifth grade students.

Contact: Dr. Peter Gretz, Assistant Superintendent of Business Operations, (804)556-5605

 

School and Campus Safety Week in Virginia

Governor McDonnell has proclaimed the week of December 9-13 as School and Campus Safety Week in the Commonwealth.  The proclamation emphasizes the critical importance of maintaining safe environments for learning in schools and on campuses. The Governor has also set December 13th as a Day of Mourning for those students and teachers who lost their lives in the tragic event at Sandy Hook Elementary School last December.  He has called for a moment of silence and reflection at 9:30 a.m. on that day.

We will observe the moment of silence in all schools and departments at the specified time. We invite our families and communities to join us in the period of reflection.

 

GCPS and the Great Southeast Shakeout

All Goochland County Public Schools participated in the Great Southeast Shakeout last Thursday, in a coordinated effort to join the entire nation in boosting earthquake response readiness in schools. Using resources provided by the Earthquake Country Alliance, our schools implemented drills designed to prepare students and staff members for the possible environmental impacts of an earthquake.

Each school did an exemplary job with the drill and we look forward to debriefing as a leadership to make any necessary improvements to our readiness procedures.

GCPS Student Artists Receive State Honor for Safe Transportation Posters

Please join me in recognizing some exemplary members of our school community. GCPS art teachers, Ms. Kim Bachman and Mr. Tom Case, encouraged their students to participate in the Virginia Association for Pupil Transportation’s poster contest. For the second consecutive year, Goochland High School students received state recognition for their exemplary submissions.

Student awards are as follows:

  • 1st place Carson Sylvester, awarded a $100.00 check and Blue Ribbon
  • 2nd place Aniya Hope, awarded a $75.00 check and Red Ribbon
  • 3rd place Justin Alley, awarded a $50.00 check and White Ribbon

The theme for the 2013 contest was “At my Stop – You Stop!” The Virginia state-wide poster contest promotes school bus safety through student artistic expression. These students’ posters will be published in the 2013-2014 VA State Pupil Transportation calendar. Look for their work to be showcased on our website and during a forthcoming school board meeting.

We hope even more GCPS students will consider submitting their work for consideration this year. The 2014 theme will be “Be Smart – Be Seen, I wait in a safe place!”

 

2013 Safe Drivers Awards

What an incredible ceremony hosted by Mrs. Thurston and her staff in recognition of our committed bus drivers and their dedicated service throughout the year. I am extremely thankful for the work our drivers do to transport children safely and to create a warm and nurturing environment for them on the bus.

Superintendent, James Lane, honors bus drivers at the 2013 Safe Driver Awards Breakfast at the American Legion Building.

I was especially honored to see our superintendent, Board members Mike Payne and Kevin Hazzard, Mike Newman and Debbie White show their appreciation by attending as well.

GHS principal Mike Newman honors GHS driver of the year, Mr. Haley.

 

Security Measures & the Ongoing Pursuit of the Safest Schools

In a formal report to the school board on February 26th, Dr. Matt Covington and I explained a three-phase approach to the security needs assessment that will undergird our safety planning efforts. The school division’s position has purposefully been a calculated one. We want to respond appropriately to the recent headlines and the awareness that has resulted across the nation. But we don’t want our safety and security measures to be reactive. Anything we do to ensure safe schools should be what we would do regardless of what might have happened in other localities.

Dr. Covington and I held two follow up meetings in which we continued to review the considerations initially proposed by our county’s first responders. Namely:

  1. Installation of security surveillance and “buzz-in” entry system at the secondary (GHS/GMS) complex
  2. Upgrading and replacement of outdoor surveillance at the secondary complex
  3. Installation of internal surveillance capabilities at the secondary complex
  4. Improvement of the surveillance systems currently in use at elementary campuses

Understand that these aren’t an exhaustive list of recommendations, but rather an initial and more pressing set of immediate improvements. Our board voted to allocate money to begin these projects immediately. As one board member commented using the analogy of a football game, these improvements are a first down along the way to a touchdown. They aren’t the completion, simply a step in the best direction.

There are certainly other initiatives that began immediately in the interest of the safest environment possible for our staff and students. To summarize our current progress in this area:

  • We have begun practicing monthly lock-down drills
  • We continue to meet with law enforcement and emergency personnel to review our plans and we anticipate further recommendations soon
  • Money has been allocated for security upgrades and we anticipate more funding in the future
  • “Active Shooter Training” for all staff has been tentatively scheduled with the Sheriff’s Department to occur prior to the next school year
  • We anticipate an increased policy presence on our school campuses

Our greater School Security Task Force, including representatives from community and emergency staff, will meet next week. We are grateful for the vast experience and expertise represented among the members and look forward to an exemplary plan for enhanced school security and crisi response.

A few of the many resources we have consulted thus far:

Lock-Down Drill A Success!

The Goochland schools continue to press on toward further establishing an environment of safety and preparedness. This past week’s division-wide lock-down drill was a tremendous success for several reasons. To highlight a few:

  • It brought necessary awareness throughout the community of the need to practice our response in these situations;
  • It gave students and teachers an opportunity to establish routines that will become an engrained part of the monthly drill activity;
  • Those who typically are not included in school-based drills, such as maintenance staff and community members who happen to be visiting the school, had the opportunity to encounter a lock-down situation and formulate invaluable questions during debriefs.

We thank the Sheriff’s Department for participating in the drill, offering first-hand, realtime advice and generally helping to create the safest schools possible.

The School Safety Task Force has continued to broaden its scope of participation and will soon welcome interested community members to the table. We look forward to including lessons learned from this drill in our planning efforts.

As always, please send me your questions and suggestions as we work together to keep our schools safe.

Meeting with First Responders

Dr. Covington and I met yesterday with Sheriff Agnew and Chief MacKay to review the school division’s crisis materials and discuss the future direction for our work together. We had a great discussion and picked up some great ideas. Specifically, we looked at our lockdown procedures, our overall communication materials, flip charts, and school level crisis management protocol.

Here is an example of the types of materials informing our work.

I am especially thankful to them both for carving out a significant amount of time and committing to participate in the safety Committee’s efforts over the next several months.

 

A Culture of Honor & Excellence

I’ve enjoyed working with Dr. Lane and Dr. Covington on the initial phase of a new Crisis Management and Planning task force. This important group will branch off into two distinct but related areas, school safety and school discipline. I look forward to working next week with our county’s first responder experts from the Sheriff’s Department and Fire & Rescue Services to assess the state of our current crisis planning materials and establish the direction of the safety committee’s work over the coming months.

School discipline and behavior is initially addressed in the Code of Conduct, which will be our first point of review. But in order to truly create a culture of honor and respect, the one we imagine for our students and community, we have to hit the roots and not just the regulatory code manual. I look forward to not only delving into the pages that define our behavior and conduct expectations and responses, but also helping to define a school climate that fills the classrooms of each school and follows students through their life in this great community.

If you have thoughts on either subject – or both – I want to hear from you.