Read and Win!!

I hope that everyone has had a fun and relaxing summer! Of course, I also hope that you have enjoyed reading! Remember to fill out your Read and Win – Be a Blue Ribbon Winner  - reading log to return to school!!!! The reading logs are due by Sept. 12th!!  All of our Blue Ribbon Winners will receive tickets for Field Day of the Past and will be recognized on Sunday, Sept. 21st at 2:30!  Be sure to join the Blue Ribbon club!!!

French IV

Welcome back to a new school year and another year of French.  I hope you had a restful summer break. I expect you to keep up with you daily assignments this year as well as learning the vocabulary and grammar concepts introduced this year.  Below you will find a reminder on how to organize your notebook.  This is a requirement for all students.

 

Every class, I expect you to have your textbook, notebook and homework as well as the appropriate supplies to write with and on.  It is important to be prepared for our class when you walk in the door.

What you will need:

One 2-inch three-ring binder with the following tabs:

  1.  Reference charts

2.  Vocabulary

3.  Workbook

4.  APT

5.  Class Notes

6.  Quizzes/Tests

I look forward to seeing you all again soon.

French III

Welcome back to a new school year and another year of French.  I hope you had a restful summer break. I expect you to keep up with you daily assignments this year as well as learning the vocabulary and grammar concepts introduced this year.  Below you will find a reminder on how to organize your notebook.  This is a requirement for all students.

 

Every class, I expect you to have your textbook, notebook and homework as well as the appropriate supplies to write with and on.  It is important to be prepared for our class when you walk in the door.

What you will need:

One 2-inch three-ring binder with the following tabs:

  1.  Reference charts

2.  Vocabulary

3.  Workbook

4.  APT

5.  Class Notes

6.  Quizzes/Tests

I look forward to seeing you all again soon.

French II

Welcome back to a new school year and another year of French.  I hope you had a restful summer break. I expect you to keep up with you daily assignments this year as well as learning the vocabulary and grammar concepts introduced this year.  Below you will find a reminder on how to organize your notebook.  This is a requirement for all students.

 

Every class, I expect you to have your textbook, notebook and homework as well as the appropriate supplies to write with and on.  It is important to be prepared for our class when you walk in the door.

What you will need:

One 2-inch three-ring binder with the following tabs:

  1.  Reference charts

2.  Vocabulary

3.  Workbook

4.  APT

5.  Class Notes

6.  Quizzes/Tests

I look forward to seeing you all again soon.

 

French I

Welcome to the new school year and the study of French.  In class we will work on the vocabulary and grammar of the French language.  In addition we will work on writing and speaking skills as well as studying the culture of France and francophone (French-speaking) countries.  I expect all of you to keep up with daily assignments and learn well the vocabulary and grammar.  I look forward to an enjoyable year.

Below you will find my requirements for your French notebook.  This is a requirement for all students in order to maintain an organized notebook.

Every class, I expect you to have your textbook, notebook and homework as well as the appropriate supplies to write with and on.  It is important to be prepared for our class when you walk in the door.

What you will need:

One 2-inch three-ring binder with the following tabs:

  1.  Reference charts

2.  Vocabulary

3.  Workbook

4.  APT

5.  Class Notes

6.  Quizzes/Tests

If you wish, you may purchase a French/English, English/French paperback dictionary.  I would recommend either Cassel’s or Larousse.

I look forward the seeing you soon.

 

Latin IV

Welcome back to the new school year.  I hope your summer break was a good one.  We plan to hit the ground running with our study of Latin.  I expect all students to keep up with the daily assignments as well as learning the vocabulary and mastering the grammar concepts.  We will continue our study of Latin culture as well.  Below is a reminder of how to organize your notebooks.  This is a requirement for all students.

All students will keep a 2” 3-ring binder with the following subject divisions in this order:

  1. Reference
  2. Glossary
  3. Derivatives/Vocabulary
  4. Quizzes/Tests
  5. Class Notes
  6. Homework
  7. Translations
  8. Culture

The information students will acquire and maintain in the specific subject divisions is as follows:

1.  Reference:  Students will be provided with templates for grammar charts.  These charts will be completed over the course of the school year as previous material is reviewed and as new material is acquired.

2.  Glossary:  Students will be provided with a glossary of the words from the textbook to aid them in translation work completed outside of class in the event that books are unavailable or for in-class use only.

3.  Derivatives/Vocabulary:  Students will maintain a running list of English derivatives from Latin words for each chapter of the textbook.  These words will be given to the students by the teacher.  Students will also produce and keep a vocabulary list for each chapter.  Each vocabulary list will divide the words by part of speech as it is listed in the textbook (including all principal parts).  In addition all nouns and adjectives will be divided into the correct declension and all verbs will be divided into the correct conjugation.

4.  Quizzes/Tests:  Students will correct and keep all quizzes and tests taken during the class in order to prevent similar mistakes on future tests.

5.  Class Notes:  Students will keep a spiral notebook or loose leaf paper dedicated only to Latin class notes.  Information students acquire in these notes will assist them in completing the reference charts.

6.  Homework:  Students will keep exercises assigned from the textbook in this section.  In addition, students will keep any worksheets generated by the teacher here.  The workbook may be kept in this section as well.

7.  Translations:  Students will keep their translations (corrected) for each lesson in this section.

8.  Culture:  Students will keep notes on the culture of ancient Rome, including mythology.

I look forward to seeing you all again soon.

Latin III

Welcome back to the new school year.  I hope your summer break was a good one.  We plan to hit the ground running with our study of Latin.  I expect all students to keep up with the daily assignments as well as learning the vocabulary and mastering the grammar concepts.  We will continue our study of Latin culture as well.  Below is a reminder of how to organize your notebooks.  This is a requirement for all students.

All students will keep a 2” 3-ring binder with the following subject divisions in this order:

  1. Reference
  2. Glossary
  3. Derivatives/Vocabulary
  4. Quizzes/Tests
  5. Class Notes
  6. Homework
  7. Translations
  8. Culture

The information students will acquire and maintain in the specific subject divisions is as follows:

1.  Reference:  Students will be provided with templates for grammar charts.  These charts will be completed over the course of the school year as previous material is reviewed and as new material is acquired.

2.  Glossary:  Students will be provided with a glossary of the words from the textbook to aid them in translation work completed outside of class in the event that books are unavailable or for in-class use only.

3.  Derivatives/Vocabulary:  Students will maintain a running list of English derivatives from Latin words for each chapter of the textbook.  These words will be given to the students by the teacher.  Students will also produce and keep a vocabulary list for each chapter.  Each vocabulary list will divide the words by part of speech as it is listed in the textbook (including all principal parts).  In addition all nouns and adjectives will be divided into the correct declension and all verbs will be divided into the correct conjugation.

4.  Quizzes/Tests:  Students will correct and keep all quizzes and tests taken during the class in order to prevent similar mistakes on future tests.

5.  Class Notes:  Students will keep a spiral notebook or loose leaf paper dedicated only to Latin class notes.  Information students acquire in these notes will assist them in completing the reference charts.

6.  Homework:  Students will keep exercises assigned from the textbook in this section.  In addition, students will keep any worksheets generated by the teacher here.  The workbook may be kept in this section as well.

7.  Translations:  Students will keep their translations (corrected) for each lesson in this section.

8.  Culture:  Students will keep notes on the culture of ancient Rome, including mythology.

I look forward to seeing you all again soon.

Latin II

Welcome back to the new school year.  I hope your summer break was a good one.  We plan to hit the ground running with our study of Latin.  I expect all students to keep up with the daily assignments as well as learning the vocabulary and mastering the grammar concepts.  We will continue our study of Latin culture as well.  Below is a reminder of how to organize your notebooks.  This is a requirement for all students.

All students will keep a 2” 3-ring binder with the following subject divisions in this order:

  1. Reference
  2. Glossary
  3. Derivatives/Vocabulary
  4. Quizzes/Tests
  5. Class Notes
  6. Homework
  7. Translations
  8. Culture

The information students will acquire and maintain in the specific subject divisions is as follows:

1.  Reference:  Students will be provided with templates for grammar charts.  These charts will be completed over the course of the school year as previous material is reviewed and as new material is acquired.

2.  Glossary:  Students will be provided with a glossary of the words from the textbook to aid them in translation work completed outside of class in the event that books are unavailable or for in-class use only.

3.  Derivatives/Vocabulary:  Students will maintain a running list of English derivatives from Latin words for each chapter of the textbook.  These words will be given to the students by the teacher.  Students will also produce and keep a vocabulary list for each chapter.  Each vocabulary list will divide the words by part of speech as it is listed in the textbook (including all principal parts).  In addition all nouns and adjectives will be divided into the correct declension and all verbs will be divided into the correct conjugation.

4.  Quizzes/Tests:  Students will correct and keep all quizzes and tests taken during the class in order to prevent similar mistakes on future tests.

5.  Class Notes:  Students will keep a spiral notebook or loose leaf paper dedicated only to Latin class notes.  Information students acquire in these notes will assist them in completing the reference charts.

6.  Homework:  Students will keep exercises assigned from the textbook in this section.  In addition, students will keep any worksheets generated by the teacher here.  The workbook may be kept in this section as well.

7.  Translations:  Students will keep their translations (corrected) for each lesson in this section.

8.  Culture:  Students will keep notes on the culture of ancient Rome, including mythology.

I look forward to seeing you all again soon.

 

 

 

 

Latin I

I would like to welcome you to the study of classical Latin.  This class covers the vocabulary, grammar, and translation of Latin as well as the daily culture of the ancient Romans.  I will expect you to keep up with all assigned work as well as learning the vocabulary and grammar of the language.  I anticipate an enjoyable and productive year with all of you.

Below you will find the directions for maintaining your notebook for Latin class.  This is a requirement for all students, and students are expected to keep your notebooks in an organized order.

All students will keep a 2” 3-ring binder with the following subject divisions in this order:

  1. Reference
  2. Glossary
  3. Derivatives/Vocabulary
  4. Quizzes/Tests
  5. Class Notes
  6. Homework
  7. Translations
  8. Culture

 The information students will acquire and maintain in the specific subject divisions is as follows:

1.  Reference:  Students will be provided with templates for grammar charts.  These charts will be completed over the course of the school year as previous material is reviewed and as new material is acquired.

2.  Glossary:  Students will be provided with a glossary of the words from the textbook to aid them in translation work completed outside of class in the event that books are unavailable or for in-class use only.

3.  Derivatives/Vocabulary:  Students will maintain a running list of English derivatives from Latin words for each chapter of the textbook.  These words will be given to the students by the teacher.  Students will also produce and keep a vocabulary list for each chapter.  Each vocabulary list will divide the words by part of speech as it is listed in the textbook (including all principal parts).  In addition all nouns and adjectives will be divided into the correct declension and all verbs will be divided into the correct conjugation.

4.  Quizzes/Tests:  Students will correct and keep all quizzes and tests taken during the class in order to prevent similar mistakes on future tests.

5.  Class Notes:  Students will keep a spiral notebook or loose leaf paper dedicated only to Latin class notes.  Information students acquire in these notes will assist them in completing the reference charts.

6.  Homework:  Students will keep exercises assigned from the textbook in this section.  In addition, students will keep any worksheets generated by the teacher here.  The workbook may be kept in this section as well.

7.  Translations:  Students will keep their translations (corrected) for each lesson in this section.

8.  Culture:  Students will keep notes on the culture of ancient Rome, including mythology.

I look forward to seeing you soon.

 

Vocabulary Exercises

CHOOSE ONE OF THE FOLLOWING THREE OPTIONS TO COMPLETE.

1.  Make creative flashcards with pictures for each vocabulary word.

2.  Create regular flashcards AND have a parent/guardian verify the fact that you studied the words for a total of 15 minutes.  Please have them write, “ Student’s name studied the vocabulary for at least 15 minutes.”  and sign.

3.  Write each of the new vocabulary words AND the English translation 10 times each.

In addition, use at least ten of the vocabulary words in ten different sentences.

Honors English 12 – Official First Post

Hello to all Honors English 12 Students.  Hopefully you all are doing well.

This marks the 1st official post under the category of HONORS ENGLISH 12 on my blog.  Get used to this site.  Most, if not all, readings and assignments will be posted on this blog.

 

IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO COME HERE AND GET WHAT YOU NEED – IF YOU HAVE LOST ANYTHING OR FORGOTTEN ANYTHING AT SCHOOL.

This is an Honors level course, and excuses will be far less ‘workable’ than a regular level class.  This statement isn’t really meant to be taken as a threat of any kind – just a reminder that the title of HONORS carries with it higher expectations than that of a regular class designation.

I’ll see you all soon.

-Mr. Wampler

 

Just a reminder – Summer Reading Assignments can be found here: http://blogs.glnd.k12.va.us/jwampler/students-entering-12th-grade-summer-assignments/

My Visit to the Computer History Museum

This July I flew to San Francisco and one of my stops was at the Computer History Museum. I wished upon visiting that I could have taken my students here over 13 years ago, when I was teaching computer applications or any of the other courses I once taught.

I wanted to share a few highlights I captured with my iPhone.

HyperCard

HyperCard came out in the mid-1980s as a new type of software development platform. It was designed to be easy for the end user to create databases of cards, using links, embedded graphics, and sounds. It was the precursor to today’s HyperStudio which I know a lot of teachers may know.

It was a remarkable piece of software created by the author of MacPaint, the photographer Bill Atkinson. It was ahead of its time as a precursor to the Web.

Alto

The Xerox Alto was the first GUI computer of note, and it was this computer that Jobs and company saw when they toured the Xerox labs at the Palo Alto Research Center (PARC). The computer had a white background on the screen, was formatted to the orientation of a printed page (tall), and used icons and a mouse to control the computer. The other device on the left is a chord input device, which allowed shortcuts by pressing down the “keys” (think like a piano) to recall common functions. Today keyboard shortcuts are likely the best equivalent.

I had never seen one up close before. It was not functional, however.

Apple 2 Computer

I learned to program BASIC (both Integer and Applesoft) on an Apple ][ microcomputer when I was in elementary school. My first Apple, however, was the //e, but my friend at the time owned this model. It is strange, perhaps, but just looking at that machine brought back vivid memories, smells, and feelings — of a time from my past as a kid. I can still feel what the keyboard was like. The Apple ][ was Apple's first major financial success after the hand-built Apple 1 models.

This next computer is what I was really into, around 1984.

Apple Lisa

This is the Apple Lisa. Named after Steve Job’s daughter, it was Apple’s first GUI-based computer to use a mouse, an inverted (white) screen, icons, and the whole lot. It was on display in a computer store in Pittsburgh when I was in the 4th grade. I could never touch it, however, because the retail price was $10,000 and they didn’t let kids play with those. Less than a year after its launch, the Mac debuted as the “smaller” cousin. It of course took over the Lisa, which is seen by many as a flop.

And finally, Illustrator.

Illustrator

Before I ever used this software, I thought it was cool. Unlike the bitmap graphics that dominated computers for so long, this program would create vector art that could print smooth on a (new) laser printer. With it, you can make graphics that have no dots at all, and it became the software for graphic designers to create maps, logos, or anything that required professional output.

When I first visited San Francisco in 1991 with a friend, his uncle took us around Silicon Valley and at his house we played on his Mac with Adobe Illustrator 88. Soon after that trip, I got a copy and started my foray into desktop publishing with Illustrator, Photoshop, and PageMaker. Today I use the similar trio of software every day (Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign).

Beyond Apple and personal computers, the museum had a lot of old mainframes, punch card machines, Cray supercomputers, and a nice exhibit on video games. If you’re ever in the San Jose area, I recommend it.

Pamunkey summer readers! You still have until August 16 to sign up!

As a member of Pamunkey Regional Library, I received this notice, and thought students who are members might find this bit about the summer reading program of interest: Signed up for the Summer Reading Program for listeners, readers, teens and adults?

It is not too late as signups can take place up until  August 16 for the reading you have done this summer.

Log into the Pamunkey Regional Library website

www.pamunkeylibrary.org

either at home or at any of our branches,

to sign up and record your titles.

Walmart Rebates for Teachers

Hello everyone!  We came across this article in the RTD about special rebate for teachers for the next week.  Hope this helps!

http://www.timesdispatch.com/business/retail/walmart-offers-rebate-for-teachers-buying-supplies/article_114c76fc-f38f-5a51-9661-bccd2db4295e.html

 

YMCA’s Bright Beginnings Program Needs Our Support!

The Bright Beginnings program is sponsored by the YMCA and provides families that struggle financially the opportunity to support their children with clothes and supplies to start the new school year.  Further detail is provided in the attached flyer and applications to volunteer.  We are looking for volunteers to help our students shop on July 28, 29, and 30.  Additionally, if you are unavailable, you can support the program through financial assistance if you are willing and able.  Please consider helping our neediest students!

Integrated Performance Assessments

In a time where those dreaded SOLs, SATs, and other standardized tests loom in the distance at the end of each school year, ask yourself…

(http://www.cagle.com/2013/09/back-to-school/

As a teacher, I often find standardized testing frustrating.  My teaching/learning style is hands-on, interactive, jump right in, and do!   I ask students to design, create, experience, collaborate, problem solve, and yes, fail (you learn from your mistakes!) all year long.  We are on the go every single day.

And then in May, I sit them down at a desk for hours at a time to take several multiple choice assessments that “show their knowledge.”   Of course, teachers have to prepare students for those tests.  We often spend valuable classroom time practicing and reviewing material in less exciting ways.  (Especially in 3rd grade as it is their first SOL experience.  Students and parents are nervous and stressed about that pass/fail number.)   Sadly, some teachers spend the whole year prepping for these tests because a portion of their evaluations are based on how students do.

However, as teachers, we are also expected to prepare students for the “real world”…now a world in which we have no idea what specific skills will be needed for the new jobs that will exist within this decade and beyond.  TIME shared a list of potential jobs that may be available  by the year 2030 – global system architect, holodeck trainer, transhumanist consultant.  Where do we begin as educators?   The score on a standardized test in no way demonstrates a student’s ability to solve a real world problem or to create something newer-bigger-better.

In an effort to create a more balanced and real world approach to testing students, Goochland has been making strides to set a new form of assessments in place for the 2014-15 school year and beyond.  Last year, a small group of teachers from upper elementary and middle school created a series of Integrated Performance Assessments and implemented them in their classrooms.

“GCPS considers IPAs to be an activity requiring students to demonstrate knowledge, understanding, skills, creativity and competencies through the creation of a product, either in groups or individually. IPAs allow students to synthesize and apply their learning to authentic contexts across subject areas, while providing teachers with authentic measures of student performance.”

The feedback from both students and teachers was hugely positive.  In fact, my students actually had fun with our “Wild About the Water Cycle” project that we adapted and made more challenging for our 3rd grade IPA.  You can check out Dr. Geyer’s blogpost from March to hear feedback from teachers.

During the 2014-15 school year, every teacher K-5 will implement at least one IPA.  Middle schools students will complete at least one per grade level, and high school students will have at least one in Physics, Chemistry, and Biology.

What will IPAs look like in the elementary classroom?  This movie trailer should give you a good idea.

 So again,

“Which bubble should our kids be asked to fill in?”

___________________

 

Want to learn more about Performance Based Assessments?  Check out any of these links for additional information:

http://www.pearsonk12.com/what-we-do/performance-based-assessments.html

https://edpolicy.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/events/materials/2011-06-linked-learning-performance-based-assessment.pdf

http://www.teach-nology.com/currenttrends/alternative_assessment/performance_based/

https://www.learner.org/workshops/socialstudies/pdf/session7/7.PerformanceAssessment.pdf

GCPS & Strategic Compensation

SUMMARY

This past school year, GCPS was awarded a competitive grant from the Virginia Department of Education to design and deliver a strategic compensation program to reward high performing teachers for achieving a wide array of goals and objectives. While the state’s grant funding will not be available for the 2014-15 school year, GCPS plans to sustain the grant’s framework.

As you’re likely already aware, Goochland County Public Schools piloted a strategic compensation model for teachers during the 2013-14 school year. This opportunity was made possible through the work of the division’s Grants Committee, who spent much of Spring 2013 pursuing the Virginia Department of Education’s strategic compensation competitive grants initiative that was announced on April 26, 2013.

On August 9, 2013, then-Governor Bob McDonnell announced that Goochland was one of 13 school divisions to be awarded the associated funding. Moreover, in his remarks, Governor McDonnell mentioned Goochland by name as having one of the strongest applications in the state. We are proud of this accomplishment, though much more proud of the ability to reward more than half of our teachers last month with bonus checks that averaged more than $3,000 (some as high as $5,000).

As last school year came to close, it appeared as if the state’s grant funding would remain in place for divisions to continue strategic compensation into the 2014-15 school year. Following the evaluation of our model, we planned to make some improvements to our structure and looked forward to continuing our efforts to reward our teachers with strategic compensation. This month we learned that the state’s grant funding was not included in the FY15 budget.

Despite this fact, we plan to sustain our strategic compensation framework as part of our overall performance evaluation and compensation model. Our School Board, Dr. Lane, and the entire division leadership team is committed to the efforts of rewarding professional excellence in the classroom – and we are exploring ways to extend the compensation model to our non-teaching staff as well.

Our leaders are working hard to identify funding that may be used to deliver on the model once again next June (June 2015), and we’re optimistic about the future viability of this innovative approach to compensating our team members above and beyond the traditional salary structure.

To our teachers – thank you … for your continued hard work and dedication to the GCPS community. We recognize that an end-of-year bonus check is not the primary motivator for your investment in our students. (Research, by the way, clearly places money 3rd or 4th on the list of what motivates most of us to work hard. Make no mistake, compensation is on the list … typically following (1) participating in a workplace with a culture of support and (2) having a voice in decision making.)

We know our team members will continue to do all of the amazing things they’ve always done for our students, our families, and our division – long before “strategic compensation” was a consideration.

Finally, we have a strong core membership to our committee who will continue to reflect on and improve our strategic compensation model moving forward. If you are a GCPS employee and interested in serving on this committee, please contact Dr. Lane (jlane@glnd.k12.va.us) or me (sgeyer@glnd.k12.va.us).

More Great Books!

I’ve been enjoying more of the titles from this year’s Reading Olympics list.  I re-read two of my favorites, From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler and Walk Two Moons.  I also was introduced to Medusa Jones and Night of the Howling Dogs.  I have several more books sitting on my nightstand.  Can’t wait!

It’s almost here…

Wow!  Is it really July 17th already?  I hope that everyone is enjoying their summer break and recharging their batteries for the upcoming school year.  As you begin thinking about 5th grade, don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any questions.

The best thing you can do right now is to read, read, and read some more.  Reading logs were sent home at the end of the school year.  Returning the completed reading log earns you an extra credit “A” during the first week of school.

Please click on the link below for school supply lists.

GCPS supply lists

Here are some dates to remember:

8/14 – Business Night (Open House) 3:00 pm – 7:00 pm

8/18 – First day of school (Woohoo!!!!!)

The fifth grade team is looking forward to an AMAZING year!  See you soon.

 

Summer School week 4


Families,

As you know, this is our final week of summer school.   We’ve covered so much material in our limited time together and I’m thankful for the opportunity to have worked with your child each day.  Please enjoy these snapshots taken during our last week together.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have a safe and happy summer,

Miss Lawson

Capital Improvement Progress

Progress on the expansion of the GHS Field House for the Marine Corps JROTC and weight training facilities as well as the renovation of the Specialty Center continues. We are excited to see these improvements coming together in anticipation of the opening of the school year. photo 2 photo 1 photo-1 photo-4 Building Trades Classroom Space

 

Class of 2018 – It’s High School Time

Class of 2018, I look forward to meeting you at the GHS freshmen orientation on August 6, 2014, 9:00 am to 1:30 pm. We will have the opportunity to talk about the high school routine, opportunities, and how four short years can make a lifetime of difference for you. I am so excited you’re part of the “bulldog” family.